Matthew 9:20-22; 20Just then a woman who had been subject to bleeding for twelve years came up behind him and touched the edge of his cloak. 21She said to herself, "If I only touch his cloak, I will be healed." 22Jesus turned and saw her. "Take heart, daughter," he said, "your faith has healed you." And the woman was healed at that moment.

Mark 5:25-34 25And a woman was there who had been subject to bleeding for twelve years. 26She had suffered a great deal under the care of many doctors and had spent all she had, yet instead of getting better she grew worse. 27When she heard about Jesus, she came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, 28because she thought, "If I just touch his clothes, I will be healed." 29Immediately her bleeding stopped and she felt in her body that she was freed from her suffering. 30At once Jesus realized that power had gone out from him. He turned around in the crowd and asked, "Who touched my clothes?" 31"You see the people crowding against you," his disciples answered, "and yet you can ask, 'Who touched me?' " 32But Jesus kept looking around to see who had done it. 33Then the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came and fell at his feet and, trembling with fear, told him the whole truth. 34He said to her, "Daughter, your faith has healed you. Go in peace and be freed from your suffering."

 

Jesus healing the bleeding woman (or "woman with an issue of blood" and other variants) is one of the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels (Matthew 9:20–22, Mark 5:25–34, Luke 8:43–48).[1] [2][3][4]

In the Gospel accounts, this miracle immediately follows the exorcism at Gerasa and is combined with the miracle of the Daughter of Jairus. The incident occurred while Jesus was traveling to Jairus' house, amid a large crowd:

And a woman was there who had been subject to bleeding for twelve years. She had suffered a great deal under the care of many doctors and had spent all she had, yet instead of getting better she grew worse. When she heard about Jesus, she came up behind him in the crowd and touched his cloak, because she thought, “If I just touch his clothes, I will be healed.” Immediately her bleeding stopped and she felt in her body that she was freed from her suffering.

 

At once Jesus realized that power had gone out from him. He turned around in the crowd and asked, “Who touched my clothes?” “You see the people crowding against you,” his disciples answered, “and yet you can ask, ‘Who touched me?’ ” But Jesus kept looking around to see who had done it.Then the woman, knowing what had happened to her, came and fell at his feet and, trembling with fear, told him the whole truth. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has healed you. Go in peace and be freed from your suffering.”

The woman's condition, which is not clear in terms of a modern medical diagnosis, is translated as an "issue of blood" in the King James Version and a "flux of blood" in the Wycliffe Bible and some other versions. In scholarly language she is often referred to by the original New Testament Greek term as the haemorrhoissa (ἡ αἱμοῤῥοοῦσα, "bleeding woman"). The text describes her as γυνὴ αἱμορροοῦσα δώδεκα ἔτη (gynē haimorroousa dōdeka etē), with haimorroousa being a verb in the active voice present participle ("having had a flow [rhēon], of blood [haima]"). Some scholars view it as menorrhagia; others as haemorrhoids.[5]

 

Because of the continual bleeding, the woman would have been continually regarded in Jewish law as a niddah or menstruating woman, and so ceremonially unclean. In order to be regarded as clean, the flow of blood would need to stop for at least 7 days. Because of the constant bleeding, this woman lived in a continual state of uncleanness which would have brought upon her social and religious isolation.[6]

 

Raising of Jairus' daughter

Raising of Jairus' Daughter by Paolo Veronese, 1546

The record of the daughter of Jairus is a combination of miracles of Jesus in the Gospels (Mark 5:21–43, Matthew 9:18–26, Luke 8:40–56).[1][2][3]

The story immediately follows the exorcism at Gerasa. Jairus (Greek: Ἰάειρος, Iaeiros, from the Hebrew name Yair), a patron or ruler of a Galilee synagogue, had asked Jesus to heal his 12-year-old daughter, who in Mark's and Luke's accounts was dying, and in Matthew's account, had already died.

As they were traveling to Jairus' house, a sick woman in the crowd touched Jesus' cloak and was healed of her sickness. Jesus turned round to the woman and said "Daughter, your faith has made you well. Go in peace." (see Luke 8:43-48) (Christ healing the bleeding woman). Moments later, a messenger arrived with the news that Jairus' daughter had died, and he was advised not to trouble Jesus any further. However, Jesus responded:

Be not afraid, only believe. (Mark 5:36)

Jesus continued to the house, where he informed all those present that the girl was not dead but asleep. He then went upstairs and restored the little girl to life. In Mark's account, the Aramaic phrase "Talitha Koum" (transliterated into Greek as ταλιθα κουμ and meaning, "Little girl, I say to you, get up!") is attributed to Jesus.

The combined stories have been used as an example of intercalation, where one incident is inserted within another, linked in this case by the connection between the 12-year ailment and the 12-year-old girl.[4]

Jesus cures the Crippled Woman

     ‘Woman, you are free…’

·         Jesus was teaching in a synagogue on the Sabbath. Among his listeners was a crippled woman. Her body was bent over so that she could not stand straight.

·         Jesus called her to the centre of the synagogue and told her she was free to stand tall. She immediately did so.

·         There was a debate about whether healing was allowed on the Sabbath. Jesus argued that the Sabbath was a day set aside for praising God, and that it should benefit people, not burden them.

Themes in the woman’s story

·         The woman’s twisted body symbolizes people who lack hope, or see only the negatives. With Jesus’ help we can lift our vision upwards towards God, and be hopeful.

·         The story inspires us to mentally straighten our selves to a standing position, where we see upwards to God for inspiration.

·         Jesus teaches that rules (like observance of the Sabbath) should be treated with respect, but they should not be a straitjacket either.

 

[The teachers of the law and the Pharisees] were using this question as a trap, in order to have a basis for accusing [Jesus]. But Jesus bent down and started to write on the ground with His finger. When they kept on questioning Him, He straightened up and said to them, “If any one of you is without sin, let him be the first to throw a stone at her.” Again He stooped down and wrote on the ground. — John 8:6–8

What was Jesus writing?

It’s fun to write messages in the sand; it can also be cathartic. Some people take photos of their messages to send to friends; others may stand and watch as the waves take the message away, as though it never existed.

What was Jesus writing?

A woman had been caught in adultery, and she was brought to Jesus. There was a group assembled, so the Pharisees “reminded” Jesus that, according to Moses’ law, she should be stoned, but they wanted to know what He had to say. Not once, but twice, Jesus stooped and wrote on the ground with His finger, and there is mysterious significance as to why John included this detail in the passage. Now, we shouldn’t miss what Jesus said in between His stooping — which is fairly critical to the story — but what was He writing?

Some believe that He was writing the Pharisees names and possibly their sins. This theory is based primarily on Jeremiah 17:13: “Those who depart from Me shall be written in the earth, because they have forsaken the Lord, the fountain of living waters.” In the preceding chapter from John, Jesus spoke of Himself as living water. So perhaps He was fulfilling a prophecy. Others believe it was to demonstrate, as God the Father did when He carved the Ten Commandments with His finger, that Jesus had the authority to issue two new commandments: for us to love one another, as He loved us (John 13:34), and to bear one another’s burdens, as indicated by Paul in Galatians 6:2.
We don’t know for sure what Jesus was writing, nor do we know who saw His message. It’s possible, however, that once the crowd had dispersed and He was left to deal with the woman Himself, He’d written only one other word:

Forgiven.
And whether that message was erased by Him or the wind, her sins were forgiven.

Lord Jesus, by Your blood and resurrection, You provided a way for my sins to be erased. Though others may try to condemn me, You do not. I need only come to You for this gift. There is nothing more I can do for salvation.

* * *

Your Turn
Have you ever wondered what did Jesus write on the ground? Imagine being one of those holding a stone ready to condemn the guilty. What could they have been thinking? Now, imagine yourself as the accused woman facing condemnation and anticipating being stoned to death. What must that have been like to be saved from a brutal death and forgiven so dramatically? Please leave a comment on our  blog. We would love to hear from you! ~ Devotionals Daily