The Birth of Moses: a Bible Story Summary

Moses' birth set the stage for Israel's rescue from slavery

by Jack Zavada

Updated September 29, 2017

Moses was a prophet of the Abrahamic religions and the youngest son of Amram and Jochebed. It was Moses who was destined to lead the children of Israel from Egypt and receive for them the Holy Torah on Mount Sinai.

Story Summary of the Birth of Moses
Many years had passed since the death of Joseph. New kings were enthroned in Egypt who had no appreciation for how Joseph had saved their country during a great famine. The birth of Moses would mark the beginning of God's plan to free his people from 400 years of Egyptian slavery.

The Hebrew people became so many in Egypt that Pharaoh began to fear them. He believed if an enemy attacked, the Hebrews might ally themselves with that enemy and conquer Egypt. To prevent that, Pharaoh ordered that all newborn Hebrew boys must be killed by the midwives to keep them from growing up and becoming soldiers.

Out of loyalty to God, the midwives refused to obey. They told Pharaoh that the Jewish mothers, unlike Egyptian women, gave birth quickly before the midwife arrived.

A handsome male child was born to Amram, of the tribe of Levi, and his wife Jochebed. For three months Jochebed hid the baby to keep him safe. When she could do that no longer, she got a basket made of bulrushes and reeds, waterproofed the bottom with bitumen and pitch, put the baby in it and set the basket on the Nile River.

Pharaoh's daughter happened to be bathing in the river at the time. When she saw the basket, she had one of her handmaidens bring it to her. She opened it and found the baby, crying. Knowing he was one of the Hebrew children, she took pity on him and planned to adopt him as her son.

The baby's sister, Miriam, was watching nearby and asked Pharaoh's daughter if she should get a Hebrew woman to nurse the baby for her. Ironically, the woman Miriam brought back was Jochebed, the child's mother, who nursed her own baby until he could be weaned and raised in the house of Pharaoh's daughter.

Pharaoh's daughter named the child Moses, which in Hebrew means "drawn out of the water" and in Egyptian was close to the word for "son."

Points of Interest From the Birth of Moses
Raised in the Egyptian court, Moses learned to read and write, equipping him to later write the first five books of the Bible.


Pharaoh's order to kill all male babies must have been withdrawn because Moses' brother Aaron was younger than him. Aaron played key roles as Moses' spokesman and later as high priest.
After the birth of Moses, we are told nothing about his upbringing. We don't know whether Pharaoh knew his adopted grandson was a Hebrew or whether Pharaoh's daughter eventually got married.
Just as Moses was drawn out of the water, God would later draw the Hebrew people out of the water--the Red Sea--to save them from the pursuing Egyptians.


Moses was a type of Christ--that is, a foreshadowing of the Messiah. Pharaoh ordered the killing of Hebrew male babies, and King Herod ordered the slaughter of all male babies in Bethlehem to try to eliminate Jesus. Moses' mother took him to safety on the Nile, and Jesus' parents took him to safety in Egypt. Moses freed God's people from slavery in Egypt, and Jesus freed God's people from the slavery of sin.


Jochebed - Mother of Moses


Meet the Old Testament mother who put her baby's life in God's hands
Jochebed was the mother of Moses, one of the major characters in the Old Testament. Her appearance is short and we are not told much about her, but one trait stands out: trust in God. Her hometown was probably Goshen, in the land of Egypt.

The story of Moses' mother is found in chapter two of Exodus, Exodus 6:20, and Numbers 26:59.

The Jews had been in Egypt 400 years. Joseph had saved the country from a famine, but eventually, he was forgotten by the Egyptian rulers, the Pharaohs.

The Pharaoh in the opening of the book of Exodus was afraid of the Jews because there were so many of them. He feared they would join a foreign army against the Egyptians or start a rebellion. He ordered all male Hebrew babies to be killed.

 

When Jochebed gave birth to a son, she saw that he was a healthy baby. Instead of letting him be murdered, she took a basket and coated the bottom with tar, to make it waterproof. Then she put the baby in it and set it among the reeds on the bank of the Nile River. At that same time, Pharaoh's daughter was bathing in the river. One of her maidservants saw the basket and brought it to her.

Miriam, the baby's sister, watched to see what would happen. Bravely, she asked Pharaoh's daughter if she should get a Hebrew woman to nurse the child. She was told to do that. Miriam fetched her mother, Jochebed -- who was also the baby's mother -- and brought her back.

Jochebed was paid to nurse and care for the boy, her own son, until he grew. Then she brought him back to Pharaoh's daughter, who raised him as her own. She named him Moses. After many hardships, Moses was used by God as his servant to free the Hebrew people from slavery and lead them to the edge of the promised land.

Jochebed's Accomplishments and Strengths
Jochebed gave birth to Moses, future Giver of the Law, and cleverly spared him from death as an infant. She also gave birth to Aaron, a high priest of Israel.

Jochebed had faith in God's protection of her baby. Only because she trusted the Lordcould she abandon her son rather than see him killed. She knew that God would take care of the child.

Life Lessons From Moses' Mother
Jochebed showed great trust in God's faithfulness. Two lessons emerge from her story. First, many unwed mothers refuse to have an abortion, yet have no choice but to place their baby for adoption. Like Jochebed, they trust God to find a loving home for their child. Their heartbreak at giving up their baby is balanced by God's favor when they obey his command not to kill the unborn.

The second lesson is for heartbroken people who have to turn their dreams over to God. They may have desired a happy marriage, a successful career, developing their talent, or some other worthwhile goal, yet circumstances prevented it. We can only get through that kind of disappointment by turning it over to God, like Jochebed put her child in his care. In his gracious way, God gives us himself, the most desirable dream we could ever imagine.

When she placed little Moses in the Nile River that day, Jochebed could not have known that he would grow up to be one of God's greatest leaders, chosen to rescue the Hebrew people from slavery in Egypt. By letting go and trusting God, an even greater dream was fulfilled. Like Jochebed, we won't always foresee God's purpose in letting go, but we can trust that his plan is even better.

Family Tree
Father - Levi
Husband - Amram
Sons - Aaron, Moses
Daughter - Miriam

Key Verses
Exodus 2:1-4
Now a man of the tribe of Levi married a Levite woman, and she became pregnant and gave birth to a son. When she saw that he was a fine child, she hid him for three months. But when she could hide him no longer, she got a papyrus basket for him and coated it with tar and pitch. Then she placed the child in it and put it among the reeds along the bank of the Nile. His sister stood at a distance to see what would happen to him. (NIV)

Exodus 2:8-10
So the girl went and got the baby's mother. Pharaoh's daughter said to her, "Take this baby and nurse him for me, and I will pay you." So the woman took the baby and nursed him. When the child grew older, she took him to Pharaoh's daughter and he became her son. She named him Moses, saying, "I drew him out of the water." (NIV)

 

Who Was Moses?

Was He More than an Exodus Hero?

Discovering the Biblical Moses

The Exodus hero Moses. The Biblical Moses, portrayed here as a shepherd in a print by contemporary Israeli artist Mordechai Beck, protectively clasps a sheep in his arms. Photo: Mordechai Beck.

Moses’ story is told in the Book of Exodus, but it starts in Genesis with the story of Abraham and his family with whom God makes a covenant. Generations later the Biblical Moses draws the extended family together in the form of a nation with a structure and code of law, given to him on Mount Sinai. Below, Peter Machinist explores the story of Moses, the Exodus hero, in “The Man Moses.”

Some might say that God himself was the Exodus hero, but in human terms the Biblical Moses takes center stage throughout the whole Pentateuch. Who was Moses? A rather solitary leader, one with his people but set apart, even in his childhood, when he was raised by the pharaoh’s daughter as if he were an Egyptian prince. Set apart also in that he married an alien wife—Midianite or possibly Ethiopian. Even his physical characteristics—a speech defect—set him apart from others and is accommodated by God who arranges a leadership duo with Moses and his priestly brother Aaron. His role was unique—even to receiving the Law and seeing God, as evidenced by Moses’ blinding countenance.

The Biblical Moses also has an unusual death. God says he must die alone on a mountaintop outside the promised land. Who was Moses? We might say he was a man who was a son of Abraham who led the people but was not typical of them.

In “The Man Moses,” Peter Machinist proposes that our Exodus hero is a type of anti-hero, outside the stereotype of a tribal or national leader. He might represent the people of Israel themselves, biblically portrayed as being outsiders. Further, Moses’ otherness might also serve to turn the spotlight not on himself but on the message he delivers to the people: The Law. Who was Moses—the Biblical Moses? Who was the man chosen to meet God on Sinai and receive the Law on behalf of God’s chosen people?

Below, Peter Machinist explores the character of the Exodus hero—the Biblical Moses—in “The Man Moses.”
 

The Man Moses

by Peter Machinist

“You shall not cross there,” God decrees as Moses gazes across the Jordan. In this 1928 pastel by Lesser Ury, heavenly light illuminates the promised land that Moses has sought almost all his life but will never enter. Rather, Moses dies on Mt. Nebo—a strange and solitary death for a strangely solitary man. The biblical portrayal of Moses as distant and unapproachable, as the only biblical leader to see God “face to face” (Deuteronomy 34:10), presents Moses as representative of the Israelites—a people apart. At the same time, it encourages readers to concentrate more on the law he gave than on the life he lived. Photo: Hans-Joachim Bartsch/Collection Jüdisches Museum Berlin.

The introduction of Moses in the first chapters of Exodus marks a new, a second beginning in the Bible’s account of the history of Israel. The first beginning had been in the Book of Genesis with Abraham and the patriarchs that followed him. There the focus was on Israel as a family bound in relationship or covenant to its God. Moses’ beginning marks the extension of the group from family to nation, though a nation still with a strong sense of kinship. Here the emphasis is on the development of a common administration, as well as on the re-presentation of the covenant as a code of law that gives the nation its structure, without which it cannot survive.

The Moses who shepherds in this second beginning dominates the biblical narrative through the remainder of the Book of Exodus, indeed through the rest of the Pentateuch; his only rival, and ultimate superior, in narrative attention, as, of course, in other spheres, is God Himself. But this Moses comes to us as a strange and difficult person. Running throughout the narrative of Exodus, and of the Pentateuch as a whole, is the depiction of a unique individual: one with little or no precedent, solitary, not easily approachable, set apart from the very community he is born to lead.

This quality apart emerges in a variety of ways. For one thing, Moses’ origins may be in the community of Israel, yet they are not of it. The text of Exodus 2 (verses 1 and following) is at pains to assign him a genealogy within the family of Israel—at pains, perhaps, because it then has to recognize that he was adopted into the court of the Pharaoh, given his name by the Pharaoh’s daughter, and raised as Egyptian royalty. It is well known what Sigmund Freud did with this portrait,1arguing that the Israelite genealogy was, in fact, a later, pious construction that tried to mask Moses’ true roots as an Egyptian who only subsequently took on the cause of the Israelite slaves as his own. Whether Freud’s thesis—and, as he made clear, he was not the originator of it—is correct or not, it does underscore the ambiguity of Moses’ connection with Israel in the biblical portrayal.

That ambiguity is fortified by other features of Moses’ family life. His wife, Zipporah, is not from Israel, but from the Midianites of the region of Sinai (e.g., Exodus 2:15–22), and her foreignness is later criticized by none other than Moses’ brother and sister, Aaron and Miriam, in the context of a challenge to Moses’ own legitimacy and leadership (Numbers 12). (Incidentally, the label that Aaron and Miriam pin on Moses’ wife, “Cushite,” has the effect of making her even stranger to an Israelite settled in Palestine, since it normally refers to the Ethiopians, a people much farther away from Palestine than the Midianites.) There is also the son Moses has with Zipporah: he is named Gershom, according to the biblical text, precisely because this is to memorialize Moses as outsider (Exodus 2:22). a Gershom has as well a curious genealogical niche. For while he has descendants, they are not arranged in a line of divine promise and authority such as is found with Abraham and his family (e.g., Genesis 26:2–5). Indeed, in Judges 18:30–31 (following here the textual tradition that reads the ancestor’s name as Moses, not Manasseh), we learn that Gershom’s descendants were priests to an idolatrous cult in the Israelite tribe of Dan.

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As for the character of Moses’ leadership, here too there is difference. He is assigned, for example, a traditional title in Israel, that of prophet—a title first given to Abraham (Genesis 20)—but he is unlike Abraham and the others, for as Deuteronomy comments: “There has not arisen a prophet since in Israel like Moses, whom Yahweh knew face to face” (Deuteronomy 34:10; cf. Numbers 12:6–8). To be sure, in another biblical encounter, Moses is not allowed to see God’s face, but only His back (Exodus 33:20–23); still that encounter leaves Moses a preternatural, even divine sheen, which once more sets him apart: “When Aaron and all the people of Israel saw Moses, his face was all aglow with radiance (qaµran), and they were afraid to come near to him” (Exodus 34:30)—just as, one may add, they had been afraid to go near to God and His quaking mountain of Sinai (Exodus 19).

Even apparent defects or negatives in the character of Moses become occasions on the part of the biblical authors to find superlatives of uniqueness. Thus, in the confrontation with Aaron and Miriam, the sinful effrontery of their challenge to Moses emerges all the more clearly in the description of Moses at the opposite extreme: “The man Moses was very meek, more than all humanity that was on the face of the earth” (Numbers 12:3). And when God commands Moses to free the Israelites from Egypt, and Moses protests his competence to challenge the Pharaoh because of a speech defect—a “heaviness of mouth and heaviness of tongue” as the text says (Exodus 4:10)—this defect is turned, by God, into the basis of a new arrangement, wherein Aaron shall do the speaking, and Moses will direct him as though he were God Himself (Exodus 4:16).

Finally, there is the matter of Moses’ death, at the end of the Pentateuch in Deuteronomy 34. It flatly contradicts the pattern of expectation that the biblical narrative had accustomed us to, namely, that promises would be fulfilled and lives would reach closure. For Moses is not allowed to die in, let alone enter, the land promised to Israel already in patriarchal days—the land that he had been divinely commanded to return Israel to, without any indication, initially, that he would be barred from it (so Exodus 3, 6:2–9). Indeed, at the end Moses cannot even be buried in the promised land, as key patriarchal figures had been, including Jacob and Joseph, who had died outside of Israel (Genesis 49:29–50:14, 24–26; Joshua 24:32–33). Rather, Moses dies and is buried outside of the land, across the Jordan River in Moab, a region otherwise often at odds with Israel; and he is buried in a spot unknown, placed there not even by human hands, but by God alone. Now the Bible, it has to be noted, tries to explain this end; yet it succeeds in doing so only by a series of incomplete and obscure reasons (Numbers 20, esp. 6–13; 27:12–14; Deuteronomy 3:26; 4:21; 32:50–52)—a situation that later Jewish commentaries, in turn, made desperate efforts to fill out and discuss, if not to clarify.2 All of this, thus, only serves to underscore what an extraordinary fate Moses is given in the biblical text, and how well it echoes and rounds out the equally strange picture of his origins in, but not of, Israel.

For the Bible, in sum, Moses is indeed a man apart—apart not only from the people he guides and the land to which he directs them, but apart also, in many fundamental ways, from the kinds of leaders the previous generations of patriarchal figures had been. He remains the permanent outsider, a unique and towering figure.